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, gay-rights, and did briefly mention education. >> no single person can trade of the single math and science teachers read for the future. we must harness new ideas to revamp the tax code and reform our schools and empower citizens with the skills they need to work harder and reach higher. lou: he did not actually say education but he did mention the word reform. he wants to change everything. if you believe the data the federal education department puts out you may think there is no need it only reflected the reality. the education department is a giddy that shows high-school graduation rate is 78-point to%. 70-point to% that is a 35 year, and not a high but the best this report, think about it. 21% is not getting it done. the education department also notes, about this, the national dropout rate is 3 percent overall down from 4% last year. are you kidding me? if only 78.2% are getting it done how does that end up at 3%? new mask? federal math? political math. is a joke not funny brought to by the department of education. a report from a nonprofit group last year told the differ
, and any of you who doubt the power of public education, it is great, i can tell you that. we raise her family and a century-old farmhouse in the yakima valley. i'd also like you to meet my three boys and their families, connor, joe, jack and his wife megan, our grandson brody, and the newest inslee, zoe ann. [applause] this is a very special day for my family. all of our elected families. and this is a very special time for many other families in our state for this reason. people all across washington stood up for fairness and family in approving marriage equality last november. we should all be proud. [applause] we should all be proud. the vote on referendum 74 represents the best of who we are as a state. it should be an inspiration for the progress we can make, always towards equality, always towards fairness, always towards justice all across the state of washington. it has been an amazing journey over the past year and a half, as i've traveled to all corners of the state. i am a 5th generation son of the state of washington, and am proud to have roots in this state that are as wid
defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program won't have enough money to pay its bills. now, whose bills? bills of seniors, bills of tennesseans who have been -- who are some, many are literal counting the days until they are old enough to be eligible for medicare so they can have some way to pay their medical bills. it would be a tragedy if that day arrived and there wasn't enough money to pay the bills, but the medicare trustees who by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program f
adults. finally, with the department of education, hhs will soon launch what we are calling a national dialogue on mental health to help change the conversation and galvanize action about our children's mental health. we have come a long way in the prevention, treatment, and recovery support for mental and addictive disorders, but we have a long way to go, and we can do better. thank you for your time today, and i would be very pleased to answer any questions you may have. >> thank you very much. now we will turn to dr. insel. welcome, once again. please proceed. >> thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member alexander, and members of the committee. it is a real honor to be here, and it is a real pairing to have hyde -- administrator hyde and me on the same panel. as a person coming to you from the national institute of mental health and the national institutes of health, my role is around the research related to mental illness and thinking about how to come up with the science that will lead to better diagnostics, better therapeutics, a better understanding of what you called a silent epi
is to educate people so that the great depression will never happen again. but it is of its time. the idea that we can teach people certain skills and that they learn these skills, we will all be okay. >> the dark side of the personal-finance industry on "after words" on c-span2. look for more booktv online. like us on facebook. >> british prime minister david cameron says that if the conservative party is returned to power at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happe
at the university of michigan. what it is is a response to, you know, a lot of new education options that are out there online and many of them are free, but, you go and take a course in history at one place, another one on writing and spanish at other places, what do you do with all the classes, especially since a lot of the other universities online they don't offer degrees. under this wisconsin university flexible option program, what students can do is earn a degree by passing a series of tests without ever stepping foot on the campus. now, you may need to take a few classes to get up to speed, but it offers students a ton of flexibility, it could really be a sign of where education is headed. you know, testing your way to a bachelor's degree. >> a lot of people go in their freshman year and say it makes sense. if i could take the test without going to the class. has the university determined how much this program will cost? >> reporter: not yet. but we're going to get more details when this thing goes online in the fall. >> okay. so i want to talk about something serious now. we should proba
and pay higher wages and improving education and job training so that more people can get the skills that businesses are looking for. it means reforming our immigration system and keeping our children safe from the menace of gun violence. and it means bringing down our deficit in a balanced way by making necessary reforms and asking every american to pay their fair share. >> meanwhile, republicans stressing their agenda today as well. cutting spending. >> our nation's total debt is now larger than our entire economy. this means that every man, woman and child owes a $53,000 share of this debt. that level of spending is unsustainable. a major credit rating agency has already downgraded our nation's credit once. and if we don't start making some real progress on spending reforms, more downgrades are likely in the near future. >> about eight minutes past the hour now. live look this is happening in washington, d.c. as we speak. this is happening really across the country. one of the main ones, this is a rally for gun control taking place in washington, d.c. people there are rallying for
counsel tree that will be america, whether it's education or training or whatever else. i just wanted to give just shout out to the brooklyn tabernacle choir. which i thought was just phenomenal. also lamar alexander, which was really exceptional and the -- not that the others weren't fine but they were. i thought the poet was great. >> that gives us an opportunity to speak more broadly about the ceremony it wasn't just the speech. the speech is at the heart of it, we can come back to that. we'll watch the president, vice president, go in to a room in the capital which they're going to sign the four nominations to the people he has mentioned that he is going to nominate for cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> he's going right to work now. >> lamar alexander, chuck schumer, vice president biden. house speaker boehner. eric cantor and nancy pelosi. >> ronald reagan established the tradition of going right to sign these kinds of documents for nominations. >> thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> at a time when we know that washington is divided by on
dedication to health and education and workplace safety. i know he will do an outstanding job and i appreciate you holding this hearing on mental health, the initial one. my first question is for administrator hyde. i want to know more about the coordination and collaboration of agencies at the federal, state and local level within your appropriate role as a federal agency, what needs to be done to better enhance that coordination and collaboration of agencies at the federal, state and local level? >> thank you, we have been trying hard to recognize the relationship between states and local communities because the state of and will create laws, rules, regulations that the community has respond to so when we provide grants to our communities we are trying to say how does this relate to the state plan and direction? when providing grants to our states we're trying to ask how are you bringing your communities into that process so we are by our grandmaking trying to bring them together through community block grant application process and asking how these things really to what is going
of you. and our goal is to educate people so that this great depression can never happen again. but it's very much in the wake oof the time an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills we will all be okay spent the dark set of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on after words on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like this on facebook. >> i think it's all an evolutionary process. you go into this role and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you're always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues you care about. you are never done. so there's never a point in time where you feel like, they are, i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. they changed is given the status issues of the country, and you never know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and fluid, and open to revolve. >> the first ladies, their private and public lives. c-span is teaming up with the white house historical association for a fi
like the red states, these reaganomics and blue states are practicing obamaomicc taxes and education going to create jobs. great thing about america we will see. we will have the experiment of which these states will prosper. i'm going to put my money on the south. >> in massachusetts also exploding healthcare costs. >> that's right. >> paul: all right, when we comeca back, hillary clinton's swan song as she prepares to leave washington a look at her final performance and her future in politics. red lobster's 30 shrimp. wow, that's a lot of shrimp. [ male announcer ] it's red lobster's 30 shrimp! for $11.99 pair any two shrimp selections on one plate! like mango jalapeÑo shrimp and parmesan crunch shrimp. just $11.99. offer ends soon! i'm ryon stewart, and i sea food diffently. but, dad, you've got... [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? >> the fact is we had four dead americans. was it because of a protest or because of guys out for a
for education. we also must insure economic development and political progress, political development. these things and these principles are very important, and this is why the arab spring took place at the end of the day. and i believe that such principles are still not respected in our countries, such freedoms are not yet respected. we still have a long way to go. regardless of what the west thinks or does not think, we don't really -- we should not really mind what the west says. the west can speak and say, and we also can speak and say whatever we think. however, i believe that the reform process must start from us, must start from the arab world. so that we would bring back the human dignity to each citizen. we must respect individuals, and we must not force any citizen to do anything that he or she does not want to do. i believe that it's the arab spring happened because of the oppression that we were living under. that oppression took away our freedoms, our liberties, our human rights, and that is why i believe that we need this revolution, we needed this revolution, and we nee
our borders to people who have all sorts of education and skills and providing a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people. that, to me, is one of the first signs that substantively the republican party is taking to heart what you're talking about. >> it's also, though, it's the theatrics of it all, and sarah palin was more theatrics than anything else. doing stupid things and saying stupid things politically, going on facebook after gabby giffords was shot, talking about blood libel, one mistake after another. >> it wasn't just that one line. >> there were, willie geist, so many republicans that really did believe -- and i told them they were dead wrong -- they really believed the benghazi hearings, and i heard this when they were getting sworn in, saying benghazi is going to be the issue where we're really going to get the country to turn on barack obama and hillary clinton. hillary clinton killed them. and once again, a self-inflicted wound. you had a senator going out saying oh, she was just faking her tears. >> oh, my god. >> and we do that time and time and t
issues to disparity in education and health care, would also be put on the agenda, and those would also be addressed. certainly a lot of that has not happened, and there is certainly a disappointment across large sectors of the black community. but it is also realistic also a sense of the constraint that the president has had. and it is not just about the president. it is also bought congress, about state houses, and about governors. there is a broader political strategy that has to enfold to achieve some of the things that people hoped would happen when president obama was elected. host: barbara, anything to add to that? guest: it is often hard to maintain the kind of levels of excitement from the first inaugural to the second, and that applies to any president, particularly this one because the expectations were so high. i compared it to a second marriage. hard to rekindle that sparked sometimes. perhaps it is the more like renewing the vows. the american people ought to fall in love again with the president. they want to have that hope and expectation. there are lots of people here.
the generational cycle of poverty is education, that is the golden ticket out of poverty. and some people just renews to have any responsibility. we keep trying to put it all on our schools or put it all on our teachers. we can't do that. jaime: let me let dr. roberts in who has over seen the process of education in two states, not tennessee. what do you think? >> i think first of all the education arena gives us our title one parenting program, and we need to look at programs that are aligning themselves with the curriculum that are being taught. we all want our parents to help their children, it's a cry for every superintendent in this country. but the question is how do we do this? i would say that we need to look at programs that we had a head start program whereby parent participation was required. we need to look at how we going to require these parents to train them to help their children, because if we can train the parents how to help their children we have demonstrated, parents go on to get ged's, they go on to get better, so that i would say to him, look at the program that is being
want him to continue to focus on social security for senior citizens. i want him to focus on education for our young people. >> on that note about social security, entitlements, everyone says entitlements are definitely a big part of trying to reduce the budget and get in line. the age thing has really made a big difference. people don't want to have to work till they're 70. what do you think about that? >> i'm still working and i'm 73. i mean, you know, i'm one of those people -- i believe in working for what you want. so i don't have a problem with -- as long as i'm healthy, i can work. >> we like that, sandra butler, thanks for getting up this morning and braving the cold, staying here with us. >> thanks for having me. >>> we have a big team covering this very special day. let's go over to jessica doyle who probably has one of the most beautiful views aside from ours overlooking the white house. she's watching people file in, in front of the capitol this morning. >> reporter: good morning to both of you. good morning to everybody at home. it's definitely arguable who has a better of
. this is renowned author, educator and political activist angela davis who spoke last night, founder of the group critical resistance, a grassroots effort to in the prison industrial complex. davis voiced support for president obama, the said much work needs to be done. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential the agendas. our passionate support for president barack obama and it is wonderful that we can say for the second time, president barack obama, and we support him and are passionate about that support. but that support should also be expressed in our determination to raise issues that have largely been ignored or not appropriately addressed by the administration. and let me say that we are aware that we should be celebrating, critically celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. [applause] there should be massive celebrations this year. what has happened other than the film "lincoln"? and of course with 2.5 million people behind bars today, the prison system, the immigrant detention system are terrible remain
good. but he has to get everybody working again. it means fix the economy. it means fix the education. so we're bringing kids along that have the skills for 21st century america. his focus has to be on the economy. on the need to reduce unemployment. and frankly, i hope he can, through his own example, restore a sense of civility in the country. >> every president learns a lot. is scarred by the office. also made more wise by the office. what is the one thing you hope president obama has learned over the last four years? >> i hope he's learned that you know, no one part of the government, really, gets it all done. and so, he's got to do a better job of reaching out to members of congress, across both -- across the aisle, to the republicans. and the republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. why aren't republican leaders shouting out about all this birther nonsense and these other things? they're silent. they need to speak out. this is the kind of intolerance i've been talking about, where these idiot presentations continue to be made. and you don't see th
donated $100 million to newark schools said he admired christie's leadership on education and reform. not happy with the endorsement and is calling on zuckerberg to cancel the event. >> absurd. >> "the birmingham news," the question that i know sam stein and all of his connecticut friends are asking this morning, how did legendary alabama coach bear bryant get his signature houndstooth hat? well, butch valdone was his friend. he says he picked it out to match his jacket and the coach started wearing it with anything. butch said bear was hopeless when it came to fashion and he even labeled his clothes so the coach could figure out which articles went with which. >> how did that make its way into the morning reads, that piece? i don't know. >> because joe has the same issue. >> i have the same issue. everything is numbered here. you think i just threw this sweater on? >> no, it's too good. >> come on. >> a lot of thought went into that. >> exactly. >> things like that just don't happen. >> numbers. >> there's a mathematical formula behind this beauty. >> there is. don't say that math c
on all of that and turn it around. state representative shawna o'connell thanks so much for educating us too, this morning. >> thank you. >> alisyn: next on the run down, we have heard manti te'o's side of the story, now the hoaxter behind the whole thing is ready to break his silence. bikini model really wants to be your friend on facebook, clayton? think again. she could be a debt collector actually coming from your cash. we'll explain. at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ ooh baby, can i do for you today? ♪ [ female announcer ] need help keeping your digestive balance? align can help. nly align has bifantis, a patented probiotic that naturally helps maintain your digestive balance. try align to help retain a balanced digestive system. try the #1 gastroenterologist recommended probiotic. align. >> we're back with a fox news alert. overnight a surge of violence across egypt. that
. >> it means encouraging businesses to create more jobs and improve education and job training to get skills businesses are looking for. reforming our immigration system and keeping our children safe from the menace of gun violence. and it means bringing down our deficit in a balanced way by making necessary reforms and asking every american to pay their fair share. i'm honored and humbled to continue to serve as your president, and i'm more hopeful than ever that four years from now with your help, this country will be prosperous, more open and more committed to the principles on which we were founded. >> meanwhile, republican governor bob mcdonnell of virginia opposes a gop ideas to replace the state's winner take all method of allocating presidential votes with one that awards votes based on congressional districts. under such a system, president obama would have lost the system to mitt romney, despite winning the popular vote. joining me now, ed o'keefe and amy parmes. >> good morning, alex. >> we heard the president lust a few things he wants to get in the second term. is there time for
, increasing opportunities in education and make sure we're keeping tuition costs down. our infrastructure is critical to our economy but we continue not to be able to get something through congress. these are big areas where we can move something forward. i think you'll see the president address many of these issues in the state of the union. >> schieffer: all right, well, i want to thank all of you, most enlightening, as we say on television. and we'll be back in a moment with our "face the nation" flashback. it's been a long, tough year. a real test of what i'm made of. there were times i thought of giving in, but i did it. opened up that navy federal savings account and now we have this... ah. did it all online... it was easy. i don't hear any sweating. civilians... psh. 4 million members. 4 million stories. navy federal credit union. >> schieffer: there has been so much bad news lately. after stories like the connecticut shootings, we always look not only for lessons learned to ensure it never happens again but also for some kind of redeeming national conversation to help us understan
is not a panacea. we have to place a lot more emphasis on human capital, particularly educating younger kids, not just college-educated kids but kids who get good vocational training for the kind of jobs that we're going to need. we're going to need to not just rely on energy but a whole lot of other things to make us competitive, including infrastructure. >> okay. we're going leave it -- actually, one final question. hillary clinton, how's she feeling? >> hillary clinton is feeling great. we just had a ceremony where we gave her a football helmet for her to wear around the house. but she has done a fabulous job. she'll probably be leaving soon. we'll all miss her. but i think one of the things that she's done and i want to emphasize this, the state department now is playing an active role in supporting american companies around the world. and i think that is one of the very important legacies. other governments are supporting their companies, the state department and other -- >> are you going to stick around? >> i hope to stay around for a while longer. >> i imagine we may see you on the "s
educational for me, mr. president, because i would listen to the concerns of my republican colleagues, and it was a lot different than what i heard in the democratic caucus, and i think we both learned a lot from each other but there was general agreement that there was a real problem in the operations of the united states senate, and that we owed an obligation to take a look at our rules and see whether we couldn't modify the rules so that we can do the type of deliberation, debate and voting that's expected of the united states senate. one of the problems that became very apparent to all of us is that individual senators are able to block the consideration of amendments and bills on the floor of the senate indefinitely, and that's wrong. my colleague from arizona pointed out that you could be in your home state and offer an objection, a bill could be brought to a standstill. that's not how the senate should operate. we should be able to consider legislation and individual senators shouldn't be able to block the consideration of legislation. i could give you hundreds of bills that ha
but zuckerberg and his wife reportedly like the christie's position on education. >>> in money news this morning, banks are chopping branches by the thousands, almost 2,300 branches closed last year, only 1,200 opened, the highest net loss since 2005. the cuts designed to save money, banks are encouraging customers to shift to online and mobile banking. >>> note to chicken little the sky is not falling. the american chicken council says there is poultry a-plenty to provide for the 1.2 billion chicken wing portions that americans will eat next weekend. the group is trying to walk back reports that wings might fly off the shelves before the big game but i would still get to the grocery store a little early. >>> manti te'o admits he was not forthcoming but he says he never lied. the notre dame linebacker told katie couric he was the victim of an online hoax, duped about a girlfriend who never existed but who actually spoke to him over the phone and for evidence, te'o brought voice mails to the katie show. >> hi, i'm just letting you know i got here and i'm getting ready for my first session and jus
, secretary of education arne duncan tweeted last night he is looking forward to being here today. how does that translate to people being here? in some ways organizer molly smith says it doesn't matter. it's all about taking action. take a listen. >> it's been a remarkable learning experience, the realization that we're citizens and this san active citizenship and being a citizen isn't just sitting around, gasping about it, talking about it or being an arm chair activist. it's actually moving into it, physically, with your body, embodying citizenship. >> reporter: victor, one of the things they're planning to do today is make their voices heard simply by their presence. they are hoping there will be thousands of people here. one indication they have is that it costs $49 thank you to put on this march in washington. they have raised almost all of that now, if not gone over a bit, just by grassroots donations. largest donation, $1,000. the smallest about $5. they've had people going through social media, saying this is important to them. what we're going to see in a couple of hours is that p
my head. stuart: i'm going to educate you and run a clip from the best scene ever. this is called the cheese shop. go. >> stillton. >> sorry. >> guda. >> no. >> norwegian yarl? >> no. >> liptar. >> no. >> white sylvan. >> no. >> danish. >> no. >> double. >> no. >>. [laughter] >> look, it goes on from there. okay? i think it's very, very funny. you perhaps do not and charles never cracked a smile throughout. never cracked a smile. you were laughing at me. >> can you imagine, citizenship test where you're required to know about that kind of humor to get in and settle permanently? >> i love the fact that they were changing the test. before you had to know how to get all of your free benefits in england and they're trying to stop that from being the test. >>; is that true >> yeah, yeah, how do you get free benefits for this, for that, and now it's time out. do you know anything about our country before you want to come here? >> and that's progress, that's real progress. admit it, payne, that's progress. >> that's progress. i've got to tell you, people who take the citizenship test in
in an education, investing in energy is the way we are going to move the country forward. >> i want to let you know what's going on, we are about to see the president come onto the inaugural platform. that's what everybody is waiting for there. i'm sorry, go ahead. >> and i think this is going to be a real conversation that he's got to win with the american people that we can do something about our finances and still accomplish all those investments to take us to the next level of energy independence, of education, competing on the world platform in education. and doing the infrastructure that we are talking about when it comes to rail, when it comes to bridges, when it comes to the basics that help businesses across america. how are you going to do that? and how are you going to convince the republicans that you have to make these investments if you are going to move the country forward? we have two different philosophies on how to create jobs in this country. republicans think the government doesn't have a role. president obama, the democrats, the progressive community believe that you have
, education, and for the war to end. host: all right. ok. that was douglas in nashville, tennessee, a democrat there. let's hear the president in his own words talking about the economy and his thoughs on social security and medicare. [video clip brbts >> for we, the people understand our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person can find independent and pride in their work. when the wages of honest labor liberate families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty though knows she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else because she is an american, she is free, and she is equal, not just in the eyes of god but also in our own. we, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard shoices -- choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. but we rej
that -- since you're on education, can i slip in he proposed the education cuts while signing the louisiana academic freedom act which lets public schoolteachers discuss creationism in science class? >> caller: oh, amen! oh don't even get me started. >> john: he doesn't want the party to be stupid. >> caller: yes sir. we just had on the ballot, we had like seven or eight amendments and on the the ballot was on there to carry a gun anywhere like at my daughter's pta meeting we got people packing in the back. why do you need a gun in a school? explain that to me. >> john: all of the socialism. there is a lot of socialism in public schools. you gotta be careful. it might catch. >> john: all of the churches this week have on their billboards, there were no guns in school when there was prayer in school. i don't know which schools they've been to but every pta meeting we have a prayer. the kids are not allowed to sing pop songs in their choir. a lot of them are hymns. i'm sorry that i'm yelling. i'm worked up. >> john: can i say every time we have a church say when there was god in school, there
, an education. but only one bathroom on that rv, right, bob? >> i learned that the hard way. >> we're all thinking it. thanks so much. great story. >>> the art of making perfect nachos for your super bowl party. no naked chips. first this is "today" on nbc. >>> this morning on "today's" kitchen, we're giving you some help with your super bowl spread. we're talking about step-by-step information that could help you build the perfect nacho. >> how do we make sure that every chip is treated with tender loving care? our nacho guru, adam rappaport is here to tell us. >> first of all, i was told we were going to be doing this outside in new orleans. my people lied to me. >> how do you make sure you don't get the dreaded naked chip? >> first of all, think of it this way. we're not making nachos. we're building nacho. you start with a good sheet tray. you need the sides. you don't want cheese oozing everywhere. you need the good chips. you need to support everything that's going on there. start layer of chips. cheese, meat, beans. >> can we stop? >> oh, boy. >> cheese. never, ever the stuff that'
. you have a good education system down there. i'm not sure i would necessarily turn it over it with all due respect to our friends in mississippi, the railroad is a good question you raised. federal government gave the land to the railroads to run railroad across the united states. talk about a false choice. the false choice is saying government doesn't do anything good. >> did i say that. >> i put words in your mouth. if you on with me more you're going to find out i'm going to put words in your mouth. martha: bob, mary katherine, look forward to with more fun. >> four years to get mad at him. >> don't hit too hard. martha: i like when you come up to the set. >> we do too. gave us 60 seconds notice from the basement. martha: good workout. bill: i thought you were a georgia girl? you're north carolina? >> i went to school in georgia but go dogs. martha: he is laughing. bill: iran claims that an american pastor imprisoned since september will be freed. his wife says don't buy it for a minute. why she says that report is just a flat-out lie. >>> plus as the gun debate rages we talk with c
an educational system that really works for all children. these are constant themes, entrepreneurship is a very strong value within our hispanic community. >> there are some other things that are not, can i show the poll, because i think you're right, i think the things you've ticked off there's no question but on some other things you might say are core to the gop message, i think you're going to have a challenge, for example, taxes, right, when you poll people, you see 69% say they favor raising the tax rate on people $250,000 and higher and i think that was obviously a big sticking point for people in the gop, also if you take a look at, there was a question reduce government programs for people like you, 48%, nearly half people and more than those who favored it said no, they would oppose reducing government programs and obviously lots of conversations with the gop about the size of government, so does that mean that you take the assessment and then you change policy potentially? >> no, i don't think you change principles but i think you change the conversation. we shouldn't be talking abou
care or education, reducing the deficit or addressing climate change. denis is represented by leaders across our government. add it all up and i think he spent most of the past four years leading interagency meetings hearing people out and listening to them and forging consensus and he holds himself accountable first and foremost. it's no easy task. through it all denis does it with class and integrity and thoughtfulness for other people's points of view. he's a public servant. he plays it straight. that's the team work i want in the white house. time and again i relied on him in the outreach to the communities. denis is a man of deep faith and our policies and programs are measured in the concrete differences that they make in the lives of our fellow human beings. and in the values that we advance as americans. denis insists on knowing for himself the real world impact of the decision we make so away from the cameras without fanfare, he's visited our troops in iraq and afghanistan repeatedly hearing their concerns, finding out what they need and then making sure to follow up. he trav
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